Exploring Emotional Health – **Review**

Review published in the August edition of  Life and ministry among young peopleLayout 1

How do you open up conversations with teens about difficult stuff like depression, emotions, self-harm or anxiety? More importantly, how do you support those who are experiencing these issues? Using creative workshops, Liz Edge gives youth leaders the tools they need to tackle some of the things young people face. She creates space where it’s safe to talk and develop the emotional literacy which will help build resilience in young people. Exploring Emotional Health isn’t the last answer, but it gives a very strong start to the conversation.

 http://bit.ly/2x014Zx

Still Vaued and Blessed (Review)

Still Valued and Blessed: Patrick Coghlan4 star

Kevin Mayhew In the growing number of books written to help those in their senior years, this will not be a standout addition, yet it does provide a useful resource for those who minister to this significant age group. Coghlan’s main purpose is to develop among seniors a mindset whereby they approach old age with a positive attitude and an expectation that God can still use them. Each chapter is short and to the point, with large-print text. There are many suggestions on how we can be used by God as we grow older: providing a listening ear and a word of encouragement, sharing our wisdom and experience setting a good example for our families, developing a ministry of prayer, and sharing our testimony. The impression given is that old age is not a time for slowing down or of losing focus because God can still use us. Coghlan seems to write for those who are still active, mentally alert and physically fit rather than for those who may be increasingly frail, in need of support and potentially housebound. This makes the book more suitable for the newly retired rather than for those who are true seniors. TH

Featured Composer of the Month

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Heather Hammond is a prolific and immensely popular composer whose work is published by Kevin Mayhew. She studied piano and clarinet at Leeds College of Music. Postgraduate studies followed in Education at Bretton Hall College, Wakefield and Music Technology at York University.

Heather currently lives in York where she divides her time between teaching and composing. She has a busy piano teaching practice and believes that it is important for young children to have fun in music and experience modern styles alongside the more traditional from an early age. She also teaches piano at Scarcroft Primary School in York.

Both The Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and London College of Music have chosen Heather’s compositions for inclusion in their examination syllabuses.

Featured Author of the Month

Nicholas King

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Nicholas King SJ is a Jesuit Priest who taught for many years in South Africa, and then at Oxford University. After a sabbatical year as a Visiting Professor at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College, and another year as Academic Director of Theology at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, he is now Lecturer in Biblical Studies at Heythrop College, University of London, and Provincial’s Delegate for Formation for the British Jesuit Province.

In 2014 Kevin Mayhew published his translation of the entire Greek Bible; and in the same year, Nicholas also produced The Helplessness of God (1501439), on how governance is done in the Bible. He is currently working on The Scandal of Christian Disunion – a biblical approach.

Nicholas King SJ was born into a strongly Catholic family in Bath, UK, and was educated at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire, and St John’s College, Oxford, where he studied Classics. He had always enjoyed the study of Latin and Greek; in those days in the (perhaps rather odd) British educational system, it seemed quite normal that he started Latin and French at the age of 8 and Greek two years later. A series of good teachers made it natural to apply to read the subject at Oxford (as far as he can recall, he never thought of anything else).

‘Exploring Emotional Health’ Kevin Mayhew Blog

‘Exploring Emotional Health’ Kevin Mayhew BlogLayout 1

 

During my teenage years, I felt a void in discussions between my Christian faith and being diagnosed with both depression and anxiety. It was as if emotional health and God didn’t mix; no one seemed to want to talk about both in the same conversation.

As I got older, I knew that there must be others out there having similar thoughts like me. Surely I couldn’t be the only teenage Christian living in the void. Over the years, I would ask myself questions such as;

How can I be a Christian and be diagnosed with depression?

 If the Bible tells me not to worry, then why am I so anxious all the time?

 Does God still love me, even though I self-harm?

 It wasn’t until I became more knowledgeable in the area of mental and emotional health that I realised Christian’s aren’t exempt from experiencing poor mental health. Being a Christian is a lived experience, and that includes living with illnesses of all kinds.

Let’s pause for a moment and see the reality that we’re currently facing:

Globally, an estimated 350 million people of all ages suffer from depression and it is the leading cause of disability worldwide. (WHO, 2015)

In the UK, anxiety disorders are estimated to affect 5-19% of all children and adolescents. (NHS, 2014)

The majority of people who are reported to self-harm are aged between 11 and 25. (Mental Health Foundation, 2017)

These are just three of the many mental and emotional health challenges young people face in our society today.

The great news is that research shows young people want to talk about these challenges with trusted adults; they no longer want them to be ‘taboo’ topics. Whether it’s because they’re facing these adversities themselves or because friends/family are struggling, young people want to talk and therefore we must listen.

So, as youth leaders, how do we even begin to effectively support the young people we work with in exploring their emotional health and Christian faith? Where does the conversation begin in this vast field?

Exploring Emotional Health: Six workshop outlines for youth leaders will enable you to begin these much-needed conversations. This practical resource breaks open the void in exploring these challenges with young people. The book covers six key topics and includes ready to go workshops on self-esteem, anxiety, depression, self-harm, identifying and coping with emotions.

Every chapter provides an essential understanding of each topic so you are equipped to run the creative workshops. They could be used as a series during term-time or simply as a one-off at a residential.

Ten years on since my experience, there are still young people today asking the same questions. By using Exploring Emotional Health you’ll be helping to close the void in openly discussing emotional health and Christian faith. Start the conversation now!

 

 References:

Mental Health Foundation (2017), Self-harm [online]. Available at: <https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/a-to-z/s/self-harm> [Accessed 7 February 2017]

 NHS (2014), Anxiety [online]. Available at http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/anxiety-children/Pages/Introduction.aspx [Accessed 27 June 2017]

 

Facebook: @LizEdgeYouthWorker

Twitter: @LizEdge_

Website: Liz-Edge.co.uk

 

 

Review And Author Q&A : Exploring Emotional Health by Liz Edge

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Exploring Emotional Health” is a fantastic blend of wisdom, vital information and sensitively structured workshop sessions for young people.  Youth workers, who might be wary or unsure about tackling topics like anxiety and depression are gently led through some introductory sessions about identifying and coping with emotions – myths are debunked, stereotypes are challenged and your confidence in tackling this subject will grow.

I’d go so far as to say that all youth work where there is a “teaching” aspect should be shaped like this.  A workshop style approach as adopted by Liz, helps young people explore the topics in their own way – space to reflect, space to ask questions, space to interact with the thoughts, feelings and comments of others.  A key question many  young people ask as they face the regular emotional upheavals of adolescence is, “am I normal?”  To unpack each subject in a way that makes it accessible, less scary and without putting young people on the spot is a real skill – Liz achieves that here.

What is a bonus, and sets this resource book apart from many others, is the holistic way that Liz approaches the whole subject and each section.  It is so important to be a reflective practitioner, but what is rare is to see questions for the youth workers to ask of themselves – as well as their young people.  This might be a tool for a youth group – and in fact, you could draw on different elements in numerous work contexts – but, it is also a tool for the youth worker.  In work and ministry, one of the best things we can offer young people is a “healthy us” – that doesn’t mean we are emotionally “sorted”, but it does mean we are prepared to go on a journey and explore our own emotions as well as those of our young people and become more emotionally literate ourselves.  This book is a gift to the Church, and a gift to youth work – if you want to see young people live life to the full (and “full” means our whole selves, everything we are – including our emotions) – then I encourage you to get it.

What follows is a brief Q&A with Liz which I hope gives you more insight to the book than my words above can, I’m looking forward to what Liz produces next!

Click Here

Exploring Emotional Health

 

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On average, three children in every class at school are affected by a mental health issue

Did you know …

  • It is estimated that half of all mental health problems manifest before the age of 14 years old

  • Child and adolescent mental health services are turning away approximately 25% of children referred to them for treatment

  • Only 0.7% of the NHS budget is spent on children’s mental health

  • 2 in 5 young carers have a mental health problem

  • 1 in 12 young people self-harm

Youth leaders recognise that issues around emotional health are growing and research shows that young people want to talk about it!

In her debut book, Exploring Emotional Health, author Liz Edge provides key information and six ready-to-go workshops covering: self-esteem; anxiety; depression; self-harm; and identify and coping with emotions, to enable even the busiest of youth leaders to provide effective support in building resilient young people.

Liz says: “This book was born out of identifying personally and professionally the need to support youth leaders and young people in exploring emotional health and faith. Each workshop is the start of an ongoing conversation that we must engage with in our practice.”

Liz Edge is a professionally qualified youth work practitioner, holding a first-class degree in Youth Work and Ministry. She has worked with young people across a wide range of Christian and other settings and now delivers innovative youth work through education, training and intervention.

To contact Liz for interviews and enquiries please email her at Liz.Edge@mail.com. Alternatively, head over to her website www.Liz-Edge.co.uk or follow her on Twitter: @LizEdge_

The Bumper Book of Resources: Instant Youth Group (Volume 8)

 

 

Imagine if you had in one place material from some of the most well-respected writers for young people!
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Anyone who works with young people knows how difficult it is to come up with something fresh and exciting that will keep them interested. And in today’s increasingly busy world, time is shorter than ever.Now imagine if there was a book that you could just dip into to help you with prayers, services, sermon ideas and illustrative material, both for general and all-age worship, that covers the major festivals of the Christian year …

Well here it is! The Bumper Book of Resources: Instant Youth Group!

Topics covered include:

Weekends away, All-age worship, Getting teenagers to talk, Club sessions, Ice breakers, Quizzes, Sessions for 9-14 year olds, Sessions for 11-16 year olds, The Church Year, Prayers, Dramas

Contributors include: David Adam; Tony Bower; Philip Eley; Nick Fawcett; Michael Forster; David Gatward; Phil Green; Nick Harding; Rob Hurd; Ray Jackson; Susan Sayers; Tim Storey, and Pete Townsend.

 

 

Downloadable Clip art resources available

This Months Featured Author – David Adam

David Adam was born in Alnwick, Northumberland and was the Vicar of Lindisfarne where he ministered to thousands of pilgrims and other visitors for thirteen years until he retired in March 2003. He is the author of many inspiring books on spirituality and prayer, and his Celtic writings have rekindled a keen interest in our Christian heritage.

David Adam

Icons of Glory

Icons of Glory is a book of intercessions for the major church festivals throughout the year.

Each set of intercessions prays for the Church, the world, the local community and our homes, the sick and those in need, ending with a remembrance of our loved ones departed. 1501513-cover-v3
The short introduction to each festival will help focus on that event. There is also an opening prayer, readings from the Scriptures, an offering of God’s peace and a blessing.Icons of Glory is a book of intercessions for the major church festivals throughout the year.

Each set of intercessions prays for the Church, the world, the local community and our homes, the sick and those in need, ending with a remembrance of our loved ones departed.

The short introduction to each festival will help focus on that event. There is also an opening prayer, readings from the Scriptures, an offering of God’s peace and a blessing.

 

Candles – Complete Common Worship Talks and Activities

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Candles were first published in three volumes, one for each year of the liturgical cycle. Since then David Adam’s teaching programme has proved to be of enduring value as a resource for those who lead children’s groups of pre-school age to 5 years. It is now being republished as a single volume, alongside its companion volume for older children, Lamps, covering Years A, B and C of Common Worship. Apart from minor revisions and updates the content of the original book remains the same. This revised edition includes a CD-Rom of the worksheets for every Sunday.

THE LORD’S PRAYER

I find that increasingly I’m forgiven for being grumpy.  At my age it is almost as though people expect it of me. So I don’t disappoint them. One of my little ‘grumps’ is that people don’t trouble to remember things any more. They just get out their smart phone and look it up – addresses, phone numbers, where they live!  Like many youngsters of the time I was brought up to remember poems, passages from Shakespeare plays, history dates, prayers and verses from the Bible. It didn’t do me any harm.  It provided a little store of things treasured away in my memory to call on when needed. I remember Terry Waite said how much he valued having a store of remembered bible verses and prayers when it came to those terrible days of solitary imprisonment in Lebanon.

One prayer that people do still make an effort to remember is t1501546-cover_1he Lord’s Prayer. In many church schools children are still encouraged to learn it by heart. But that doesn’t always work as it should.

My grandfather who was headmaster of a small primary school in Kent used to tell the story of the time a visitor came to the school and stood at the back of the hall during assembly.  Afterwards, over a cup of tea he told my grandfather that when it had come to the Lord’s Prayer the children were saying; ‘Our Father, chart in heaven, hollering down the lane’. It was the best sense they could make of the words.

It still makes me smile and wonder what children have made of some of the things I have said in schools and churches. We all do our best to make sense of what we hear but don’t necessarily properly understand.

Could that happen with the Lord’s Prayer and adults?  You bet it could, you bet it does.  Knowing the Lords’ Prayer, even off by heart, isn’t the same as understanding it’s meaning.  We live in an age when its imagined that knowing something, a fact, is the same as understanding its meaning.  It isn’t.

Here is the most important prayer we could ever learn – a prayer taught us by Jesus himself. It doesn’t ramble on, it doesn’t use particularly difficult words. It is rich in meaning and spiritually important – it comforts and it challenges. But the very familiarity of the words means we so seldom stop to ask what they really mean – what they meant to Jesus, what they meant for his disciples, what they mean for us. Next time you use that prayer as part of your private prayer time don’t rattle it off.  Say it slowly. Think about each phrase, what it means for you, for this day. And if you want a bit of help why not take a look at a book just published by Kevin Mayhew: ‘The challenge of the Lords’ Prayer.’  It could make more sense than ‘hollering down the lane’.